Will India ever make Bhagavad Gita the constitution?

Asked 14-Sep-2022
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India is a land of paradoxes. A land where spirituality and religion are revered, yet caste and communalism continue to fester. A land of dichotomies, where the ancient and the modern, the traditional and the modern, the spiritual and the material, the Eastern and the Western, all clash and coexist.

There is no denying that the Bhagavad Gitais one of the most important Hinduscriptures. It is a text that has been revered by Hindus for centuries and is seen as a key text in the Hindu religion. The Gita is a text that has been read by millions of Hindus and is seen as a key text in the Hindu religion. It is a text that has been used by Hindus to guide their lives and is seen as a key text in the Hindu religion. 

So, the question is, will India ever make the Bhagavad Gita the constitution? 

It is no surprise then that the question of whether India will ever make the Bhagavad Gita its constitution is one that evokes strong emotions and opinions.

For some, the very idea is preposterous. How can a country that is home to so many religions, languages, and cultures, ever have one uniform constitution? They argue that the Bhagavad Gita, with its Hindu philosophical and religious underpinnings, is simply too specific to be applicable to the entire country.

Others believe that the Bhagavad Gita is the only book that truly encapsulates the essence of India. They argue that its message of love, tolerance, and non-violence is one that is needed now more than ever in a country that is grappling with religious and caste violence.

There are those who believe that the Bhagavad Gita should not be the constitution because it is a religious text. They argue that a secular constitution is necessary to ensure the rights of all citizens, regardless of their religion.

And then there are those who believe that the Bhagavad Gita is the only way to save India from itself. They believe that the country is in a state of moral and spiritual decline and that only by making the Bhagavad Gita the constitution, can India hope to claw its way back to greatness.

Whatever your opinion on the matter, there is no denying that the question of whether India will ever make the Bhagavad Gita its constitution is one that is sure to continue to provoke debate and discussion for many years to come. It is a complex and sensitive issue, the debates on whether or not to make the Gita the constitution of India are unlikely to be resolved soon.