What are three long term causes of the Cold War?

Asked 28-Oct-2018
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The Cold War was a period of time between the end of World War II in 1945 and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. This period of time was marked by a rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union that was characterized by political and military tensions, proxy wars, and economic competition.

Though the Cold War has ended, it is still important to consider the long-term causes that led to it in order to gain a better understanding of the events that took place. Three of the most significant long-term causes of the Cold War include ideological differences, geopolitical tensions, and economic competition.

Ideological Differences

The ideological differences between the United States and the Soviet Union were one of the primary long-term causes of the Cold War. The United States, a capitalist country, championed individual liberty and private property ownership, while the Soviet Union, a communist country, believed in a centrally-planned economy and collective ownership of resources. These two different ideologies were incompatible, and neither side was willing to budge on their beliefs. These ideological differences created a deep-seated distrust between the two countries that would become the foundation of the Cold War.

Geopolitical Tensions

The United States and the Soviet Union were also at odds over their respective geopolitical agendas. The United States wanted to spread democracy around the world, while the Soviet Union wanted to spread communism. This led to a competition between the two countries over who could gain more influence in countries around the world. As each side jockeyed for power, the tensions between them grew, and the risk of open conflict increased.

Economic Competition

Finally, the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for economic dominance was a major long-term cause of the Cold War. The United States wanted to promote free-market capitalism and globalization, while the Soviet Union wanted to promote state-controlled socialism and economic autarky. This economic competition led to a race by each country to out-produce the other, leading to a buildup of military forces and an increase in tensions.

The Cold War was a complex and multifaceted event, and while it may be over, it is important to understand the long-term causes that led to it. Ideological differences, geopolitical tensions, and economic competition were all major long-term causes of the Cold War, and understanding them is essential for anyone interested in the history of this period.

What are three long term causes of the Cold War