Who was an engineer who lobbied Congress to pass the Transcontinental Railroad Act but died before the railroad was finished?

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Anonymous User asked 16-May-2018 in History, Politics & Society by Anonymous User

Who was an engineer who lobbied Congress to pass the Transcontinental Railroad Act but died before the railroad was finished?


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Anonymous User answered 12-Sep-2018 by Anonymous User

'Theodore Judah' was the engineer who lobbied Congress to pass the Transcontinental Railroad Act but died before the railroad was finished.

Who was an engineer who lobbied Congress to pass the Transcontinental Railroad Act but died before the railroad was finished?

Theodore Judah was born in the year 1826 in Bridgeport, Connecticut. In 1830, America had only 23 miles of track, yet the railroad business was going to detonate. As a kid, Judah examined the structural building. By 18 he was a railroad surveyor, giving himself a viable training in innovation, not by any means two decades old.

A Practical Plan
Specialists were popular in the late 1840s, as tracks spread over the wide open like crawling vines. Judah's energy earned him the moniker 'Insane Judah,' yet by 1856 he and his men had constructed the Sacramento Valley Line, the primary railroad west of the Missouri River.

Who was an engineer who lobbied Congress to pass the Transcontinental Railroad Act but died before the railroad was finished?

The next year he distributed a leaflet, 'A Practical Plan for Building the Pacific Railroad,' auditing designing issues and painting dreams of a country joined by tracks and business across the nation. Such a railroad had been talked about for a considerable length of time - yet the financing and building hindrances were impressive.

Emotional strain mounted between some business associates and Theodore Judah right after when Abraham Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act in 1862. Theodore was in search of finding new partners but during his journey to New York he got sick adversely and died in the year 1863.

“All The Best”