Before the Emancipation Proclamation, how were enslaved African Americans captured by Union forces often treated?

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Anonymous User asked 15-Apr-2018 in USA History by Anonymous User
Before the Emancipation Proclamation, how were enslaved African Americans captured by Union forces often treated?

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Anonymous User answered 16-May-2018 by Anonymous User

'A Proclamation… '

Before the Emancipation Proclamation, how were enslaved African Americans captured by Union forces often treated?

By the President of the United States of America:

Though, on the twenty-second day of September, in the time of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, an announcement was issued by the President of the United States, containing, in addition to other things, the accompanying, to mind:

'That on the primary day of January, in the time of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all people held as slaves inside any State or assigned piece of a State, the general population whereof should then be in insubordination to the United States, might be at that point, thenceforward, and always free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and maritime expert thereof, will perceive and keep up the flexibility of such people, and will do no demonstration or acts to curb such people, or any of them, in any endeavors they may make for their genuine opportunity.

'That the Executive will, on the main day of January previously mentioned, by decree, assign the States and parts of States, assuming any, in which the general population thereof, separately, should then be in resistance to the United States; and the way that any State, or the general population thereof, might on that day be, in accordance with some basic honesty, spoke to in the Congress of the United States by individuals picked thereto at races wherein a larger part of the qualified voters of such State should have taken part, should, without solid countervailing declaration, be esteemed convincing proof that such State, and the general population thereof, are not then in defiance to the United States.'

Presently, along these lines I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by excellence of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of real furnished resistance to the specialist and administration of the United States, and as a fit and fundamental war measure for smothering said defiance, do, on this first day of January, in the time of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and as per my motivation so to do freely broadcasted for the full time of one hundred days, from the day first previously mentioned, arrange and assign as the States and parts of States wherein the general population thereof individually, are this day in insubordination to the United States, the accompanying, to mind:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (with the exception of the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (with the exception of the forty-eight districts assigned as West Virginia, and furthermore the provinces of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the urban communities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left accurately as though this announcement was not issued.

Also, by ideals of the power, and for the reason aforementioned, I do arrange and announce that all people held as slaves inside said assigned States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward might be free; and that the Executive legislature of the United States, including the military and maritime specialists thereof, will perceive and keep up the flexibility of said people.

What's more, I, therefore, charge upon the general population so pronounced to be allowed to keep away from all brutality, unless in essential self-protection; and I prescribe to them that, in all situations when permitted, they work dependably for sensible wages.

Also, I additionally proclaim and make known, that such people of appropriate condition, will be gotten into the equipped administration of the United States to battalion fortresses, positions, stations, and different places, and to man vessels of assorted types in said benefit.

What's more, upon this demonstration, genuinely accepted to be a demonstration of equity, justified by the Constitution, upon military need, I conjure the chivalrous judgment of humanity and the benevolent support of Almighty God.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and made the seal of the United States be appended.

Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the time of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh.


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