Which battle of 1571 marked the end of the Ottoman naval supremacy in the Mediterranean?

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nitya singh asked 28-Feb-2018 in History, Politics & Society by nitya singh
edited 30-Jul-2018 by Harsh-Srivastava

Which battle of 1571 marked the end of the Ottoman naval supremacy in the Mediterranean?

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Anonymous User answered 30-Jul-2018 by Anonymous User

The Battle of Lepanto is the jackpot of verifiable maritime defining moments. It broke the Ottoman Empire's mastery of the eastern Mediterranean and denoted a turning of the tide in the long-stewing struggle between the European forces (especially the Habsburgs) and the Ottomans. It gave European Christians the certainty that they could face the dreaded Ottomans and really leave away with a noteworthy triumph.

Which battle of 1571 marked the end of the Ottoman naval supremacy in the Mediterranean?


All things considered, sort of. That is to say, it did those things, pretty much, however not all of a sudden and not in any case evidently in the years quickly following the fight. Lepanto had extensive effects, however, the greater part of them required a long time to truly shake out. What's more, one of its most extensive effects really had next to no to do with the European-Ottoman clash and everything with the way maritime fighting would be led from that point on.
In 1570 and mid-1571, the Ottomans kept on making considerable pick up in the eastern Mediterranean, a relentless walk that had proceeded since the clashes of Preveza in 1538 and Djerba in 1560. Just the fizzled Siege of Malta had put a brake on the domain's Mediterranean development, and even that was certifiably not an immense difficulty.
By this point, Ottoman considerations were centered around Cyprus, which was ostensibly a Venetian ownership yet whose urban communities, one by one, were being brought under Ottoman control. At the point when the Ottomans laid attack to the city of Famagusta, the keep going Venetian city on the island, Pope Pius V amassed a Holy League, much the same as the one that Paul III had collected for Preveza.
Looking back, the Ottoman armada that met the Christians at Lepanto was absolutely overmatched. The Christians had fewer ships and fewer men, however, they had around 2.5 times the quantity of guns in their armada and the Christian fighters on load up its boats were conveying guns, while at the same time the Ottomans were as yet dependent on what was customarily their most pulverizing maritime weapon– toxophilite.
 Fundamentally, the Ottomans were prepared to battle a conventional maritime fight, while at the same time the Christians were prepared to battle the sort of maritime fight that would be the standard after Lepanto.
The one issue with the galleass was that since it was enormous and overwhelming, it relied upon its sails considerably more than the galleys, which had cruises, however, were still principally paddled.

In awful breeze conditions, it was conceivable that your armada's galleasses won't not, in any case, get into the battle. John got around this issue by having his galleasses pulled to the front of his fight line and tied down there, with their broadside firearms confronting the Ottoman armada.
Toward the day's end, the Ottomans lost more than 200 boats, contrasted with around 50 for the Holy League. Uluç Ali was the just a single of the Ottoman officers to rescue his armada and get it back to Constantinople, where he was later delegated Grand Admiral and start improving the Ottoman armada along the lines of what he'd seen at Lepanto– greater boats, more guns, troops furnished with guns instead of bows, and so forth.